Recipes

Recipes

Recipes

Recipes

the finest recipes from the friendly island of

St Maarten / St Martin

TIP:

Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America

St Maarten recipesCaribbean cookery has been not well served by the locale’s eateries, a hefty portion of which give flat dishes and irresolute endeavors at “Mainland” classics. Accordingly, most guests to the islands never taste genuine Caribbean sustenance, which is frequently sensitive, complex and refreshingly zesty. This jolly cookbook embarks to repair the Caribbean’s culinary notoriety. Wonderfully shot and perseveringly happy, the volume incorporates formulas for top picks like Grilled Jerk Chicken, Salt Fish Fritters and Quick-Time Pepperpot Soup. Cuban Oxtail with Riojà is daringly rich and generous, and Pumpkin Lobster Bisque is absolutely wanton.. read more …


ourRecipes

Island Barbecue

Sweet and Sour Barbecue Sauce

A simple recipe using easily obtained tropical ingredients, this sauce is especially good for seafood, poultry and rib dishes.
sweet and sour barbecue sauce
1/2 cup unsweetened pineapple juice
1/4 cup tamarind nectar
2 tablespoons freshly squiced lime juice
2 tablespoons molasses
1/2 tablespoon hot pepper sauce

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and heat, stirring frequently until well blended. Cool, poor into a jar, cover it up and refrigerate it until needed for use. When refrigerated, this sauce will remain fresh for months.

Rum Barbecue Sauce

This recipe actually has its roots in Southern cooking. Though some ingredients have been replaced, rum for bourbon and Pickapeppa brown for Worcestershire sauce, the results of this Island version are spectacular!
Rum Barbecue Sauce
6 ounces tomato paste
1/3 cap dark rum
1/4 cup distilled white vinegar
1/4 cup molasses
2 medium crushed garlic cloves
1 tablespoon Jamaican Pickapeppa Sauce
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Combine all ingredients in a blender or food processor for 2 minutes. Pour into a saucepan and bring to a quick boil (prolonged boiling will caramelize the molasses). Let it cool down, poor into a jar, cover tightly, and refrigerate. Wehn carefully covered and refrigerated, this sauce will remain fresh for several months.

Callaloo Soup

A National Dish from St. Maarten / St. Martin
Callaloo Soup
2 pounds fresh kale

1/2 pound callaloo, or fresh spinach
12 okra pods
1/4 pound salt pork, cut into thin strips
1/2 pound fresh lean pork, cubed
2 onions, thinly sliced
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 hot pepper, seeds removed, sliced
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
6 cups chicken stock

Pull all stems from kale and callaloo and discard them. Roughly chop the leaves in pieces after washing, also roughly chop the kale. Place salt port in a large, heavy soup kettle and saute over medium heat for 10 minutes, rendering fat. Discard all but 2 tablespoons of fat. Add pork cubes and onions to pan. Saute over medium heat until cubes are brown and onions are translucent, about 5 minutes. Add kale, callaloo, okra, black pepper and hot pepper. Add thyme and stock. Cover and simmer 2 1/2 hours. Remove salt pork before serving.


Fish

Cashew Crusted Atlantic Salmon Fillet

(with wok fried Baby Bok Choy in Oyster Sauce)
Cashew Crusted Salmon Fillet
6-8 oz Salmon Fillet
3 cups fresh chopped Cashew Nuts
Honey Mustard Sauce:
1/2 cup Yellow Mustard
1/2 cup Dijon Mustard
1 Clove Minced Garlic
3 tablespoons Honey
Salt and Pepper to taste
Combine all the ingredients
2 heads of Baby Bok Choy
6 tablespoons Oyster Sauce (Lee Kum Kee)
Canola Oil
1 teaspoon Minced Ginger
1 Clove Minced Garlic

Season the salmon fillet with salt and pepper then brush with honey mustard and roll them in the crushed cashew. Heat a skillet to moderate heat and place the fillets skin side up in the skillet. Pan fry on low heat for 4 minutes and place in a preheated oven (400 degrees Fahrenheit) for 10 to 15 minutes.
Meanwhile cut the leaves off the head of Bok Choy; rinse them and blanch for 2 minutes.
Heat a wok or skillet at moderate heat. Add 2 tablespoons of oil to the ginger and the garlic. Stir fry for 1/2 minute, then add the Bok Choy and continue to stir fry on high heat for 2 minutes. Add the oyster sauce and 3 tablespoons water and simmer for a minute.
Serve with Basmati Rice mixed with some fresh Dill and enjoy!
Recipe by: Marvin van Eyck

Spicy Barbecued Tuna with Mango Salsa

Spicy Barbecued Tuna with Mango SalsaThis is a great dish! The salsa, coconut, and ginger blended together gie an exotic flavor.

1/3 cup red cooking wine
1/4 cup coconut oil
1 teaspoon ginger powder
6 tuna steaks, each about 8 onz and 3/4-inch thick
Mango Salsa

Mix the wine, ginger and the oil together in order to marinate the tuna steaks in a shallow dish for about an hour. Sometimes turn the steaks and when ready reserve the marinade.
Grill the tuna steaks over hot coals for about 4 minutes on 1 side, while basting them with the rest of the marinade. Turn them and gril the other side for about another 4 minutes, until the segments start to seperate.
Serve the tuna on plates together with some mango salsa pored over them, and your favorite side dishes. a nice cold Carib would go perfectly with the tuna.

Jerked King Fish

Jerked King Fish

6 kingfish steaks, 8 ounces each
1/2 cup lime or lemon juice
1/3 cup Jerk Marinade recipe

Wash steaks in the lime or lemon juice, rinse, and pat dry. Place in a shallow dish and pour the jerk marinade over. Turn steaks so that both sides are well coated. Remove steaks from the marinade, reserving the marinade. Place the steaks over hot coals and cook them for 5 minutes on each side, basting them with the marinade before turning. Transfer steaks to serving plates and serve with Jamaican Hard Dough Bread and your favorite beverage.

Grilled Shrimp with Sweet and Sour Barbecue Sauce

Grilled Shrimp with Sweet and Sour Barbecue Sauce

1/4 cup coconut oil
1 cup Sweet and Sour Barbecue Sauce recepe
2 pounds large shrimp, peeled and deveined

Combine coconut oil and 1/2 cup Sweet and Sour Barbecue Sauce in a bowl and stir well. Place shrimp in a shallow dish and pour marinade over shrimp. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours. Remove shrimp from the marinade, and thread on skewers. Grill over hot fire, about 4 inches above the coals, for about 6 minutes, or until they turn pink, brushing on reserved marinade. Serve hot off the grill with remaining 1/2 cup of sauce for dipping.

Grilled Oysters

Grilled Oysters

24 unopened oysters
1/2 cup melted butter
12 lemon wedges
1/3 cup Caribbean Pepper Sauce

Scrub oysters thoroughly with a stiff-bristled brush and rinse under cold water. Over hot coals, arrange the oysters on aluminum foil in which holes have been punched. Grill until the shells pop open. Use an oyster knife, regular knife, or a screwdriver to remove the shallow shell. Serve oyster in the deeper shell. Place them on a serving tray. Place the melted butter, lemon wedges, and pepper sauce in the middle of the tray. Allow 4 oysters per person. Note: If any oyster is cracked before grilling, discard. Also, if any oyster does not pop open readily with the rest, providing it was put on the grill at the same time, discard.

Grilled Lobster Tails with Rum Barbecue Sauce

Grilled Lobster Tails with Rum Barbecue Sauce

6 spiny rock lobster tails, 10 ounces each
1/3 cup lime or lemon juice
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/3 cup softened butter
2/3 cup Rum Barbecue Sauce

To prepare lobster tails for grilling, remove the soft undercover of the lobster and crack the upper shell with a cleaver to flatten the tail. In a small bowl mix the lime or lemon juice, salt, paprika, and thyme. Brush the tails with the mixture and dot them with the butter. Reserve the marinade. Place the lobster tails split-side down over hot coals, 4 to 5 inches from the coals, and grill covered for 4 minutes on each side (or until the flesh is opaque), basting frequently with the reserved marinade. The shells will turn orange-red when the tails are cooked. Transfer the lobster tails to serving plates and serve with the barbecue sauce on the side. Grilled lobster tails are excellent with grilled potatoes and asparagus spears.

Breadfruit

Was the breadfruit the rebellion fruit? From the far Polynesian islands, the artocarpus altilis (from the Greek artos, bread, and karpos, fruit), in other words the breadfruit arrived in a rather stormy way to the Caribbean.Breadfruit St Maarten
Breadfruit
Since the dawn of time, the Polynesian people have known the culinary qualities of the “uru”, as they called the breadfruit. This big round fruit with a rough and green skin has all the nutritional qualities one could ever dream of. High in calories and starch, the breadfruit does not contain any seeds in its light yellow pulp and can be cooked in an endless variety of recipes. The mature bread tree reaches around 45 feet. It displays deep green and large sculpted leaves. An hermaphrodite, it makes both male and female separate flowers. It easily fits into any tropical area, on the sea front as well as in medium altitudes. A ten year old tree can produce over a hundred fruits per year, each one weighing from one to two kilograms. Classified in the moraceae family and listed by Commerson and Sonnerat in 1770, the breadfruit held some clever English settlers’ attention who had the great idea to introduce it onto their sugar cane plantation. The breadfruit spread to all the islands and was very welcome, having been given the place of honor during celebration days and being the life-saver during food shortages. As the years went by, its use broadened into soups or cheese dishes, served with salted beef or pork, in cod doughnuts or after fermentation in vegetal cheese, and in desserts. Its use does not stop in the kitchen but goes into the medicinal making of herbal teas thanks to its leaves and flowers. The gummosis secreted by the fruit bread was used to caulk the hull of the ships or could also be used in painting when mixed with ochre or other natural pigments. The Jack fruit or artocarpus intergnifalius is a close cousin of the breadfruit with more or less the same nutritional qualities. Once roasted or boiled, its seeds remind you of the light taste of chestnut. The wood of the Jack fruit as opposed to the breadfruit has the look of red mahogany when aged, so it is sought after by cabinetmakers. Moreover when cut, its sap gives a natural dye of deep yellow. Helped by the improvement in transportation, the newly available food supply led to the diminishing use of one of the most popular staples in West Indian cooking: the breadfruit. However, this fruit has always kept a special place in the cooking of Saint-Martin families: in soup or desserts, as a tasty side-dish with fish or meat, or just standing in for bread. It has practically become a specialty for a limited audience and is very scarce on the market stalls. The breadfruit is now the subject of negotiation between gourmets and gardens owners. Going from “the dish of the poor” to the “traditional dish”, the breadfruit is happily finding its place back on our tables.

Breadfruit Soup

1 very ripe breadfruit
100g of smoked bacon
1 spring onion
1 yellow onion
1 pt of milk
Salt, pepper, cinnamon

Peel the breadfruit, discard the heart and dice the flesh in small cubes. Boil in water with the spring onion for 60 minutes. Strain and grind coarsely. Fry the diced bacon with the chopped yellow onion, then mix with the flesh of the breadfruit. Add the milk and a little of the cooked juice. Season and serve.

Breadfruit Cake

breadfruit Cake1 very ripe breadfruit
3 eggs
250g of flour
50g of brown sugar
0.75 quart of coco milk
1 pinch of salt

Peel the breadfruit, discard the heart and finely grind the flesh. Whisk the eggs with the sugar, and then blend with the flour, mashed breadfruit, coco milk and the salt. Pour into a buttered mold and cook in the oven at 150o. for 60 minutes. Serve cold, cut in thick slices.

Breadfruit Migan

1 breadfruit
1 lb of pig tails
100g of smoked bacon
1 yellow onion stuck with cloves
Salt, pepper, crushed garlic, thyme, parsley, fresh spicy pepper, cinnamon

Peel the breadfruit, discard the heart and cut the flesh and the pig tails into big pieces and dice the smoked bacon. Put all the ingredients into boiling water, and then simmer on a low heat for 90 minutes. Adjust the seasoning and serve.

Poultry & Rabbit

Jerked Chicken Wings

Jerked Chicken Wings3 pounds chicken wings
1/2 cup lime or lemon juice
3/4 cup Jerk Marinade recipe (above)

Use a sharpened cleaver to chop between the wing and leg sections of the chicken wings and separate. Place in a large container, pour over lime or lemon juice, and rinse under cold running water. Pat dry and place the wings in a large nonreactive container. Pour over a half-cup of the jerk marinade and ensure that all the wings are coated. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove marinated wings from the refrigerator 30 minutes before grilling and let stand at room temperature. Place the chicken wings over medium-hot coals and grill for about 15 minutes on one side, turning once. Baste with the remaining marinade and grill for an additional 10 minutes, or until wings are browned to your taste. Transfer to a serving platter and serve with Jamaican Hard Dough Bread and cold Red Stripe beer.


St Maarten Recipes

Get your own Caribbean Cookbook

Caribbean cookery has been not well served by the locale’s eateries, a hefty portion of which give flat dishes and irresolute endeavors at “Mainland” classics. Accordingly, most guests to the islands never taste genuine Caribbean sustenance, which is frequently sensitive, complex and refreshingly zesty. This jolly cookbook embarks to repair the Caribbean’s culinary notoriety. Wonderfully shot and perseveringly happy, the volume incorporates formulas for top picks like Grilled Jerk Chicken, Salt Fish Fritters and Quick-Time Pepperpot Soup. Cuban Oxtail with Riojà is daringly rich and generous, and Pumpkin Lobster Bisque is absolutely wanton… read more @ Amazon … and order.


Grilled Quail

Grilled Quail12 quail
1/4 cup lime or lemon juice
2 teaspoons dried thyme
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 Scotch Bonnet or jalapeno pepper, stem removed, seeded, and minced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/2 cup vegetable oil

Flatten the quail by splitting them up the backbone, using a knife or poultry shears. Place quail skin side up on a chopping board and further flatten with karate-like chops with your hand. Rub the lime or lemon juice in the quail’s cavities, and let stand for 5 minutes. In a small bowl combine thyme, garlic, onion, fresh pepper, salt, and black pepper. Rub the seasonings into the birds, inside and out, and baste with the vegetable oil. Grill quail, skin side up for 5 minutes over hot coals, about 5 inches above the fire. Turn and grill for another 10 minutes, or until birds are golden brown, basting with oil. (Cooking time depends largely on the size of the birds.) Transfer to serving plates and serve warm with Grilled Sweet Potato or wild rice.

Grilled Rabbit with Rum Barbecue Sauce

Grilled Rabbit with Rum Barbecue Sauce3 pounds rabbit, cut into mouth-size pieces
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 cup olive oil
1 cup Rum Barbecue Sauce recipe
1 teaspoon cornstarch
1/4 cup lukewarm water
1/2 cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon butter
Salt to taste

Place rabbit pieces in a large nonreactive bowl. Combine the thyme, olive oil, and sauce and pour it over the rabbit. Cover and marinate overnight, turning the pieces occasionally. Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before grilling. Remove rabbit from the marinade, reserving marinade. Place rabbit over hot coals and grill covered for 35 minutes, basting frequently and turning occasionally. Transfer rabbit to a serving platter and cover to keep warm. In a small saucepan combine remainder of marinade with cornstarch that has been dissolved in lukewarm water. Add broth, butter, and salt. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until thickened and smooth. Transfer the rabbit to serving plates and spoon sauce over rabbit in equal proportions. Serve with Island Rice and Peas and Island Potpourri Salad.

Recipi by: EAT ​ST. MAARTEN

Nasi Goreng

Nasi Gorengis a fried rice dish, the word ‘nasi’ means rice, and ‘goreng’ means fried.
In addition to the basic rice component, nasi goreng may be made with an array of additional ingredients that includes meat, seafood, and vegetables. The fried rice may also be seasoned with various sauces and spices.

Eventhough Nasi Goreng is one of the most popular dishes in Chinese Restaurants here in St. Maarten it is not a Chinese dish.
It originated in Indonesia and Malaysia, where it is extremely popular in both restaurants and made at home and is also one of the most popular street foods sold by cart vendors, food stalls, and roadside diners.

At Indonesian celebrations, nasi goreng is an essential component of festive buffets. In home kitchens, the dish is often eaten for breakfast and is made with leftover rice from the previous night’s dinner.

The main ingredient in nasi goreng is cooked rice that has been allowed to cool. Leftover rice is ideal, as it can be quickly added to the dish without overcooking. Long-grain rice is the best type to use since it is less starchy than short-grain or medium-grain rice and doesn’t become sticky or lumpy.

here you’ll find some delicious Nasi Goreng recipes from our friends at EATSXM, including tips and some cool

Caribbean Greens